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Tips on Training, Boats and Paddles for Endurance Paddling Races

Submitted by on December 20, 2008 – 1:15 pm 3 Comments

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Fitness Paddling, Training and Racing


Fit2Paddle – Fitness Paddling Blog

A collection of articles from my blog with a focus on long distance racing.

Training Concepts for Paddlers

Training guidelines for the non-elite paddler by Bruce von Borstel

iRULE

Adventure Sportswear from New Zealand with good articles on training and racing

Engineered Athlete Services

Coaching thoughts, tools and sport science ideas from Alan Carlson

… and more

Simon River Sports

Kathmandu Crazyman

Established in 1991, the Kathmandu Crazyman is one of New Zealand’s longest running multisport events and attracts around 500 entrants every year. Participants enter as individuals or teams in either the full multisport format (run/mountain bike/kayak) or as duathletes (run/mountain bike).

Surfski.info

The world premier surfski portal based in South Africa with a mine of useful and interesting articles, tips and race reports; regularly updated.

NY Mayor’s Cup

WaterTribe

Expedition style races in small boats (paddling and sailing). Some old articles by Steve Isaak (aka Chief) and 10 tips by Devo from the WaterTribe Magazine:

Epic Kayaks

3 Comments »

  • Jim Kemp says:

    Hello:

    Most of the information I have read says the paddle should exit the water when the lower hand is at the hip. Lately I have seen writings that say, that exiting when the paddle blade is at the hip might be more efficient when using a wing paddle. I would be interested in any thoughts on this subject.

    Thanks

    Jim

  • Great articles on training! One concept that gets lost is posture. Even with the best intents on training, if you are training around a body with muscle imbalances present, your best efforts will be squandered away. They say perfect practice makes perfect competition, however feel is not real. Videotaping of one’s stroke can often identify asymmetrical patterns in paddling strokes. These can often be traced back to those muscle imbalances contributing to postural asymmetries which inturn cause sub optimal strokes.
    JaneeMatteson

  • dre says:

    As a kayaking newbie (and hopefully one-day MR340 racer), I’m really enjoying your site. Thanks for compiling such a great list of resources and references. This is very helpful!

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